Cancelled - Stargazing Live (Public Stargazing Event)

Stargazing Live 2016 Banner.jpg

Do you fancy an evenings stargazing?

** Sorry we have had to cancel the Saturday event as well. we were hoping the  glorious sunshine would continue into this EVENING, but UNFORTUNATELY forecast clouds have rolled in and rain is FOREcASTED for later. We will try and re-arrange the event in the near future.**

We are delighted to inform you that we have re-scheduled our public Star Gazing Live event to the 1st and 2nd April after its initial postponement due to bad weather in late January.

These events follow the popular BBC Stargazing Live TV series that was broadcast in January, were Astronomy societies across the country teamed up to provide the general public with the opportunity to look at the night sky through high powered astronomy telescopes. 

The event is at the same location as our Cosmic Kidz event, Woodrow House Nr Amersham, but on the field next to the observatory.

The event will run from 8pm until 10pm on both days, and is open to all members of the public.  Children are very welcome at this event, but obviously the younger ones will need to be supervised by an adult.

Subject to the cloud conditions on the night, visitors will be able to look at a variety of objects including treasures within the constellation of Orion through the large Celestron Telescope situated within our observatory.  In addition we will have a variety of other telescopes and binoculars trained on a host of interesting objects, each hosted by a society member eager to share the wonders of the night sky with you.

There will be experts on hand to answer questions about all aspects of astronomy including the equipment involved and tips on how to get started, so this is a great chance to get a taste for astronomy in a relaxed and friendly environment.

The event will take place on the field next to our Observatory, at Woodrow House Nr Amersham.  For more details about how to find the venue please click the link below;

http://www.wycombeastro.org/location.html

On arrival at Woodrow House please look out for the Car Park Marshalls who will direct you to a car parking space.

Wycombe Astronomical Society is a not for profits organisation so there is no fixed charge for this event, we would however like to request a minimum donation to the society of £2 per adult to help us cover the costs.

We hope to see you there, but in the meantime if you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact us.

events@wycombeastro.org

**Event cancelled. Registration form removed **

Nik Szymanek ‘Astrophotography’

Wednesday, March 16th (held at 8:00 pm at Coleshill Village Hall)

Nik Szymanek, is a prolific Astrophotographer, sky photographer, musician (rock drummer) and astronomy writer, based in Essex, England. He is especially known for his stunning deep sky CCD images and his contributions to education and public outreach. He collaborates with professional astronomers and works with big telescopes located at La Palma in the Canary Islands, and at the Hawaii Islands.His imaging and image-processing abilities brought him the Amateur Achievement Award of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific in 2004. He publishes his pictures in astronomical magazines and has written a books on astrophotography called “Infinity Rising” and “Shooting Stars”.  The ‘Astrophotography curious’ amongst you really shouldn’t miss this one!

 

Professor Bob Lambourne ‘The Birth, Life and Death of Stars’

Wednesday, Feb 17th (held at 8:00 pm at Coleshill Village Hall)

Bob Lambourne is head of The Open University Physics and Astronomy Department. His research interests include astronomy and physics education, and he teaches across many fields including astronomy, particle physics, relativity and cosmology. Bob’s lectures are always popular and we are delighted that he is able to speak for us this time about the lifespan of stars.

Postponed - Stargazing Live Event - 22nd and 23rd January 2016

WE ARE SORRY TO ANNOUNCE THAT THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED DUE TO POOR OBSERVING CONDITIONS (WEATHER AND EXPECTED GROUND ISSUES ON SITE) - THIS EFFECTS BOTH FRIDAY AND SATURDAY EVENING. WE ARE VERY DISAPPOINTED BUT WILL ADVISE AS SOON AS NEW DATES HAVE BEEN FIXED.

Stargazing Live 2016 Banner.jpg

Do you fancy an evenings stargazing?

We are delighted to be hosting a Stargazing Live Event on the evenings of 22nd and 23rd of January 2016.

Following the popular BBC Stargazing Live TV series broadcast from the 12th January, Astronomy societies across the country team up to provide the general public with  the opportunity to look at the night sky through high powered astronomy telescopes.

The event will run from 8pm until 10pm on both days, and is open to all members of the public.  Children are very welcome at this event, but obviously the younger ones will need to be supervised by an adult.

Subject to the cloud conditions on the night, visitors will be able to look at a variety of objects including treasures within the constellation of Orion through the large Celestron Telescope situated within our observatory.  In addition we will have a variety of other telescopes and binoculars trained on a host of interesting objects, each hosted by a society member eager to share the wonders of the night sky with you.

There will be experts on hand to answer questions about all aspects of astronomy including the equipment involved and tips on how to get started, so this is a great chance to get a taste for astronomy in a relaxed and friendly environment.

The event will take place on the field next to our Observatory, at Woodrow House Nr Amersham.  For more details about how to find the venue please click the link below;

http://www.wycombeastro.org/location.html

On arrival at Woodrow House please look out for the Car Park Marshalls who will direct you to a car parking space.

Wycombe Astronomical Society is a not for profits organisation so there is no fixed charge for this event, we would however like to request a minimum donation to the society of £2 per adult to help us cover the costs.

We hope to see you there, but in the meantime if you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact us.

events@wycombeastro.org

Accessories - 7th January 2016 with Sandy Giles

WAS Practical-

Hi everyone and Happy New Year!

We kick off our 2016 programme of Practical Sessions on Thursday, 7th January in the Frankie Vaughan Studio at Woodrow with a discussion about Accessories.

This is to be a Show & Tell session, where our members will bring along one accessory and will "Tell us" what it is, and how it helps with their Astronomical endeavours.

What do we mean by an Accessory? Well, basically anything other than your optical aid (by which I mean scope, binoculars or naked eye).

I shall bring along two pieces of software I bought recently to assist me with astronomical image processing. I’ll also show you how I take flat frames.

We look forward to seeing you all on Thursday.

 

Cosmic Kidz – Junior Astronomy and Science Event

On Saturday 5th December 2015 at Woodrow House near Amersham, we shall be joining forces with; the Tring Astronomy Centre, The Space Studio at Banbury and Sirius Astronomy to bring you a fantastic Junior Astronomy and Science Event that we are calling Cosmic Kidz!

Starting at 2pm this exciting event will feature Astronomy and Science related displays, talks, workshops and demonstrations aimed at children (5 -16 years old) and families interested in finding out more about Astronomy and space exploration.  See Fun and Exciting Activities on this page for more details.

There will be friendly advice on hand from members of our society, The Tring Astronomy Centre, The Space Studio at Banbury, Sirius Astronomy and more.

Entry will cost no more than a £2 donation per person and there will also be chances to win a computerised telescope! 

If you are interested in attending or participating in this event as an individual or an organisation then please register your interest by filling in the form below:

Your Name *
Your Name
Please tell us who you are.
Provide us will a number we can call you on.
Please tell us how old the kids are so we can ensure the event is suitable for them.
Enter any questions or comments you have and we will get back to you a.s.a.p.
 

Fun and exciting activities

Event entry fee - £2 donation per person

PDF version


In the Sports Hall

* Planetarium shows - 2.30pm, 3.30pm and 4.30pm

* Making comet demonstrations - 2pm and 5pm

* Space Suit Talk - 3pm to 4pm
See a  real Russian Sokol Space Suit just like the one Tim Peake will wear on his journey to the ISS on 15th December!  

* Telescope equipment displays - 2pm and 5pm

*Microscope Viewing - 2pm to 5pm


Outside (Subject to weather conditions)

On the green next to the Observatory

* Solar viewing  - 2pm to 4pm

* An evening’s stargazing -6pm to late
Through a selection of high powered specialist astronomical telescopes after nightfall.

Outside Observatory

* Observatory tour - 2pm to 4pm


COMPETITIONS AND PRIZES

PRIZE RAFFLE - TICKETS £2 EACH OR 3 FOR £5

* 1st Prize - Celestron Nexstar 4SE (SRP £539)
* 2nd Prize - Astronomy Binoculars (SRP £99)
* 3rd Prize - £50 voucher to spend at Tring Astronomy Centre

Children's Quiz Draw - free entry

* 1st Prize - Celestron Powerseeker 80AZ (SRP £145)
* 2nd Prize - Astronauts Handbook
* 3rd Prize - 3D Bugs

Draws will take place at the end of the event


How to get here

The event will take inside the Sports Hall and next to our Observatory at Woodrow House.

Click here for detailed directions.

 
 

Pluto and the outer solar system by Dr Mike Leggett FRAS FBIS

Wednesday 18th November at Woodrow High House Sports Hall.

This Lecture details the discovery of Pluto and Charon.

Dr Mike Leggett discusses Pluto: planet or dwarf planet?

He will cover -Neptunian Objects. Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt. Kuiper Belt Objects. Plutinos. Cubewanos plus the New Horizons mission to Pluto, Charon and the Kuiper Belt. Oort Cloud. Comets. The boundary of the Solar System. Pioneer &Voyager's Interstellar Mission.

A Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society and a Fellow of the British Interplanetary Society, Dr Mike Leggett is also a member of the British Astronomical Association, the Planetary Society and the Society for the History of Astronomy (SHA). As a participant in the SHA Survey of the Astronomical History of the UK, he is currently the coordinator for Buckinghamshire, Lincolnshire and Rutland.

As a founder member of the South Lincolnshire Astronomical and Geophysical Society in 1976, he began to present astronomy talks for his local society. Since that time he has presented lectures for the British Interplanetary Society, at University of Aberdeen evening classes, for the Society for the History of Astronomy and to astronomical societies and other groups throughout the UK. He is currently Publicity Officer for the Milton Keynes Astronomical Society, for whom he has also served as Chairman and Secretary. He is also a Council Member and Publicity Officer for the Society for the History of Astronomy (SHA) and county co-ordinator for Buckinghamshire, Lincolnshire, Norfolk and Rutland in the SHA survey of astronomical history of the UK.

A Graduate in Chemistry and Pharmacology from the University of Nottingham, Dr Leggett also holds a PhD in Chemistry. A Chartered Chemist and a Member of the Royal Society of Chemistry, he is a member of the Astrophysical Chemistry Group. He also holds a Postgraduate Diploma in Technical Authorship and Communication and is Member of the Institute of Scientific and Technical Communicators.

Cancelled - Professor Nigel Mason - Astrobiology ~ Understanding The Origins Of Life

Wednesday 21st October, 7pm – 9pm

Sorry - please note, this event has been cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances and will be re-scheduled a.s.a.p.

Professor Nigel Mason

Nigel John Mason was born into physics, his father being Sir John Mason FRS, Director General of the Meteorological Office and a noted environmental physicist. Thus he was "indoctrinated" at an early stage into recognizing physics as the premier science.

 After graduating from University College London in 1983 his postgraduate studies involved the study of electron collisions with atoms and molecules in the presence of laser fields. As part of the atomic physics group at UCL he was able to demonstrate, for the first time, a prediction first made in the 1930s that in a three-body collision between an electron, atom and photon the electron may excite the atom by "absorbing" the photon, even if its initial kinetic energy is less than the excitation energy of the atomic state.

 Awarded a SERC Postdoctoral Fellowship in 1988 and a Royal Society University Research Fellowship in 1990 he established the Molecular Physics Group in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London in 1990. The group rapidly developed a wide ranging research programme studying atmospheric physics (in particular the mechanisms of ozone depletion and global warming), collision physics and plasma physics. He was a co-founder of the UCL Centre of Cosmic Chemistry and Physics commencing a research programme to study molecular formation in the interstellar medium and planetary atmospheres.

 Appointed Lecturer in 1998 and Reader in 2000 he joined the Open University in September 2002 as Professor of Physics. Co-founder of the Interdisciplinary Centre for Astrobiology and The Centre of Atomic and Molecular Engineering his research interests have expanded to include research in nanotechnology, radiation chemistry and the origins of life.

 He has served on many National and International Committees and co-ordinates several major European projects. He is a keen promoter of physics and public understanding of science having held senior positions in both the Institute of Physics and the British Association of Science. In his spare time (!) he writes on military history, in particular the Napoleonic Wars. Married to Jane they share their house in Heath and Reach with two Turkish Van Cats, Pushkin and Vashka.

He will endeavour to take us on a wonderful & enlightening journey to discover &

Understand the Origins of Life....

'Where is everyone? Answering Fermi's Paradox. (or not).’ by Paul Hill BA(hons) PGCE FRAS

Wednesday 16th September at Woodrow.

Paul Hill BA(hons) PGCE FRAS

An elected fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, co-presenter and writer of the popular Awesome Astronomy podcast, committee member of the world famous Baker Street Irregular Astronomers and has appeared on BBC News and Radio to discuss a range of astronomy and space issues as well as being interviewed on The BBC’s flagship astronomy program, The Sky At Night.  He is also part of the team that runs the bi-annual, family friendly AstroCamp in the Brecon Beacons. Pauls mission is to take astronomy education into schools and the wider community, enthusing children and adults alike about the universe around us.

Paul will take us on a journey through cosmology, the life and death of stars, life on Earth and what it tells us about what is potentially the ultimate question. 
It will cover a little of the original topic that Prof Rawlings was going to cover, but very briefly and will go in a different direction and be thought provoking so as to leave the door open for the original lecture at a later date.
And no, the answer is not 42.

Prof Jonathan Rawlings- Birth, Life And Death Of Stars- POSTPONED

Wednesday 16th September 7pm - 10pm

>>> Postponed until further Notice <<<

 

Jonathan was an undergraduate at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge where he gained a BA in Natural Sciences (Physics) in 1982.


He obtained an MSc in Astronomy from the University of Sussex in 1983 and a PhD in Molecular Astrophysics from UMIST in 1986.


He spent a further three years at UMIST as a SERC Postdoctoral Research Assistant (1986-89) and was a Research Assistant at the Max Planck Institute, Munich, in 1990. He then held a SERC Research Fellowship at Oxford (1990-2) before returning to UMIST as a Research Associate/Temporary Lecturer (1992-4).


He took up a Lectureship at UCL in 1994, was promoted to Reader in 2001 and Professor in 2006. He has served on several PPARC/IAU/RSC committees etc.


His research interests cover a wide range of theoretical and observational topics in molecular astrophysics, but are largely centred on the study of stellar outflows and protostellar inflows.


Major areas of activity include: molecule and dust formation (and evolution) in the ejecta of novae and other strongly irradiated circumstellar environments, the chemistry of excited state atomic/molecular species, and low mass star-forming regions, with a special interest in the earliest stages of protostellar infall.


Appointments

Professor of Astrophysics
Dept of Physics & Astronomy
Faculty of Maths & Physical Sciences

Academic Background

1986 PhD Doctor of Philosophy – Molecular Astrophysics University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology
1983 MSc Master of Science – Astronomy University of Sussex
1982 MA Master of Arts (Hons) – Theoretical Physics University of Cambridge


We welcome Jonathan and his insight into the Life Cycle of Stars...

 

 

Messier – His Optics and Objects, Sandy Giles, 15th July 2015

This lecture describes the life and work of Charles Messier, the 18th Century French astronomer whose one hundred and nine Messier Objects still sustain the interest of amateur and professional astronomers today. In addition to describing some of the astronomical objects in Messier’s list, and illustrating them with photographs taken largely by members of Wycombe Astronomical Society, the lecture will cover a brief history of telescopes and the challenges, opportunities (and sometimes hindrances) they presented to the early pioneer astronomers.

Sandy has been a member of Wycombe Astronomical Society since 2007 and is currently a member of the society’s Committee. He runs the Practical Meetings on the first Thursday of every month.

 

Paul Hyde - Radio Astronomy

Wednesday 20th May

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm - Sports Hall- Woodrow High House.

 

History of the RAG

The history of radio astronomy within the BAA dates back to 1955 when Martin Ryle gave a lecture describing the work that amateur enthusiasts could undertake. The BAA Radio and Electronics Section was duly set with John Heywood as its first Director. Contributors included Frank Hyde who made the first amateur observations of the Crab Nebula being occulted by the solar corona in 1959 and who wrote the definitive guide "Radio Astronomy for Amateurs". Frank also provided the regular 'Spacewatch' column for Practical Electronics magazine. Another notable figure was John Smith who took over the leadership of the renamed Radio Astronomy Section from 1964 through to 1977 and was a major force in encouraging amateur involvement in the field.

                                                                                                               John Smith with 30ft (9m) diameter parabolic aerial.

 

Sadly, after John died, interest waned and the Section ceased to operate.

However in 1994, the current Radio Astronomy Group was created with Gordon Brown as its coordinator, later to be followed by Peter King, Laurence Newell and, most recently, Paul Hyde.

Paul will provide a basic introduction to Amateur Radio Astronomy and show what can be achieved with some basic radio equipment, simple antennas, and a computer.

 

Stargazing Live Public Observing Events 27th and 28th March

Do you fancy an evenings stargazing?

We are delighted to be hosting a Stargazing Live Event on the evenings of 27th and 28th of March 2015 Following the popular BBC Stargazing Live TV series broadcast from the 18th - 20th March, Astronomy societies across the country team up to provide the general public with  the opportunity to look at the night sky through high powered astronomy telescopes.

This year together with Tring Astronomy Centre we will be hosting a Stargazing Live event on the evenings of 27th and 28th March 2015 at Woodrow High House near Amersham Bucks. The event will run from 8pm until 10pm on both days, and is open to all members of the public.  Children are very welcome at this event, but obviously the younger ones will need to be supervised by an adult.

Subject to the cloud conditions on the night, visitors will be able to look at a variety of objects including Jupiter and its arrangement of moons through the large Celestron Telescope situated within the Wycombe Astronomical Society Observatory.  In addition we will have a variety of other telescopes and binoculars trained on a host of interesting objects, each hosted by a society member eager to share the wonders of the night sky with you.

There will be experts on hand to answer questions about all aspects of astronomy including the equipment involved and tips on how to get started, so this is a great chance to get a taste for astronomy in a relaxed and friendly environment.

If thats not enough! light refreshments including tea, coffee and cake will also be available on the evening.

The event will take place on the field next to the Observatory, at Woodrow House Nr Amersham.  For more details about how to find the venue please click the link below;

http://wycombeastro.org/location.html

On arrival at Woodrow House please look out for the Car Park Marshalls who will direct you to a car parking space.

Wycombe Astronomical Society is a not for profits organisation so there is no fixed charge for this event, we would however like to request a minimum donation to the society of £2 per adult to help us cover the costs.

We hope to see you there, but in the meantime if you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact us.

events@wycombeastro.org  or you can contact Neil or Jane at Tring Astronomy Centre on 01442 822997 who will be happy to answer questions about the event.

David Whitehouse - 'Journey to The Centre of The Earth'

Wednesday 15 April 20:00 – 22:00

Dr David Whitehouse is a scientist, journalist and the author of five books, including THE SUN and THE MOON. He is a fellow of the Royal Astronomical

Society a regular broadcaster on science-related matters for the BBC's Today programme, Sky News and the Jeremy Vine Show. He has won numerous awards

for his reportage.


The journey to the centre of the earth is a voyage like no other we can imagine. Over 6300 km below the earth's surface an extraordinary inner world

the size of mars awaits us. Dive through the molten iron of the outer core and eventually you will reach a solid sphere - an iron-clad world held

within a metal sea and unattached to anything above. At the earth's core is the history of our planet written in temperature and pressure, crystals

and minerals ...Our planet appears tranquil from outer space. And yet the arcs of volcanoes, the earthquake zones and the auroral glow rippling above

our heads are testimony to something remarkable happening inside ...For thousands of years these phenomena were explained in legend and myth. Only in

recent times has the brave new science of seismology emerged. One hundred and fifty years after the extraordinary, imaginative feat of Jules Verne's

JOURNEY TO THE CENTRE OF THE EARTH, David Whitehouse embarks on a voyage of scientific discovery into the heart of our world. Seismologists today

reveal a planet astonishingly buried within a planet. We watch as supercomputers convert signals from the ground into three-dimensional scans of

subterranean continents, visit laboratories where scientists attempt to reproduce the intense conditions at the centre of the Earth, travel down the

throat of a volcano, look into the deepest hole ever drilled, and imagine a voyage through enormous crystals of iron. Whitehouse's enthralling

journey vividly charts all we are able to understand about the mysteries of the deep Earth. His book encompasses the history of our planet and the

latest findings about its inner core, allowing us to embark on an adventure that brings us closer to the enigma of our existence.


Jane A Green - Basketballs and Beyond

Wednesday 18th March, Sportshall, Woodrow High House,



A unique illustrated voyage, beginning with ‘something of nothing’ and journeying to all that is everything – using perspective to capture the awesome, inspiring and, above all, enjoyable wonders of the cosmos.

Jane A Green is a professional speaker, author and broadcaster who has co-presented with the late Sir Patrick Moore CBE FRS, celebrities and media professionals, and has been featured in various astronomy publications and scripted a live television/theatre interview with the second man on the moon, US astronaut Edwin ‘Buzz’ Aldrin.
 
She has been a guest on BBC Radio Four’s Midweek programme, BBC Two’s Stargazing Live, various national and local BBC Radio stations and, most recently, co-presenter of the TOUR OF THE UNIVERSE 2014 – a national theatre tour appearing with the presenters of television’s Sky at Night programme and other high-profile speakers – she is currently Uckfield 105FM’s resident astronomer and a co-host of Astronomy FM Under British Skies.
 
Her book, the Haynes Astronomy Manual, is an international best-seller and was listed at No 6 on Amazon’s ‘List of Collectible Astronomers Books for 2011’.
 
As Dr Brian May states, Jane has “… taken up the challenge of doing for a new generation what Sir Patrick did for us all those years ago”.
 Her enthusiasm, as with the science of astronomy, is infectious.

Nick Howes - The Greatest Scope on Earth

Wednesday, 17 June 2015
8:00 PM - Sports Hall - Woodrow High House.


For over 400 years humanity has gazed to the heavens with ever more powerful telescopes, capturing the skies in greater levels of detail.

Nick Howe's will talk about "A Brief History of Telescopes" & "The Greatest Scope on Earth", due to revolutionise the very future of astronomy.

As a science writer, he has over 400 NASA ADS citations for observational work on comets and asteroids.

Entered in the Guinness Book of records for leading a team of UK Astronomers in creating the World's largest image composite of the Moon taken by ground based observations, he is an astronomer working with the Kielder Observatory as well as a freelance science writer whose work has included science writer for the European Space Agencies Science Portal and NASA Blueshift.

 

 - The Greatest Scope on Earth -

Remote Imaging by Chris Baker

Wednesday 18th February

Chris is a Keen astro photographer based in the UK. 

Most, if not all his imaging, is done remotely in Nerpio - Spain.

Lecture starts at 8:00pm in the Sports Hall.

Bio

I am a keen amateur astronomer based in Hertfordshire and for a number of years have been imaging deep sky objects. 
I started observing in 2000 when I first bought a SC and eventually acquired a roll-off roof observatory as I got into Imaging.
Even though at that time it was black and white, I have always concentrated on deep sky objects.
A few years ago I became increasingly frustrated with the poor weather and the fact the trees around my garden gave me a limited sky.  If I was to really produce deep images then I would need a lot of data which was impossible from home.
It was then I made the move, in mid 2012 to remote, then robotic imaging, transforming what I was able to achieve.
In the past two years I have produced images that I could never have done from the UK; with a number featured in astronomy magazines.
It has radically improved the hobby and opened up new possibilities, as an example I will shortly start some scientific projects in addition to the imaging.
I have two grown up boys and an understanding wife!

The talk

Those attending will learn what remote and robotic imaging is all about. The pain and the gain!
What options are there? What are the benefits and disadvantages?
I will  focus on remote imaging using one’s own equipment. What has been the experience?
What needs to be considered if you want to do the same? Equipment, software, sites, support?
I will cover my experiences from setting-up to where I am today.
I will show many images from the first attempt to images that have won prizes.
If the weather and comms allows, then we will link to the remote site live and set an imaging run during the talk.
I will also spend a short time processing live a set of FITS acquired remotely, using the Hubble palette method, to show what can be achieved.
Finally we can have a quick competition- with the prize being the opportunity to use the equipment, with my help.
The talk will be informative, informal and fun, I hope!
If anybody wants some high quality FITS data (up to 30 hours for one image) to practise processing, then I will make this available for free.

How Do I Use My New Telescope?

Bring your telescope along to a basic, practical session on how to set up, find a few objects in the winter sky and answer any questions you may have.

Meeting will be taking place at Woodrow Sports Hall on Thursday January 8th commencing at 8:00pm. Follow the link below for directions:

http://www.wycombeastro.org/locations/

Hot drinks will be available and we recommend warm, winter coats & hats for when observing from the field adjacent to our observatory.

(Clear skies permitting.)

Try out some imaging using your mobile phone or ask about Astro-Photography using DSLR Cameras or even web-cams.

We look forward to seeing you :)